While the design of a website is already separated from the content by using CSS (Cascading Style Sheets), the scripting features of a website can also be pulled out off the HTML file.

Read more…

I have recently joined twitter, mostly because of the hype and not because I see any very good use :)

All people complain about the stability and I can really understand why. Since I am not using any twitter client currently and their IM Jabber service is still down, I have to use the website. It sometimes loads slow or not at all which is really annoying. I can understand why power users hate that.

What I noticed when searching users from Stuttgart is that users which you already follow are displayed in a different color and have some options aside. So, for every search you do, the database table with the people you follow is checked too. This is of course very nice for usability but if everything in twitter is luxurious like that then no wonder they have issues about their load.

By the way, Sebastian is also on twitter.

You are wondering why your JUnit tests run very fine when you launch them using Eclipse, whereas they all break down when building your project with a build system like Ant or Maven?

Well, thats probably because you are using assert statements and Eclipse per default is not configured to evaluate them.

To solve this problem, simpy go to Run -> Run… -> Arguments, and in the box labeled VM arguments:, enter either -enableassertions or just -ea.

That’s it!

Today, I had some time to spend on my new open source movie collection web application, MovDB2.
I did some thinking about infrastructure, and collected my decisions on the project wiki.

The thing is: Most of these decisions have been done more or less arbitrarily.
I’ll list my available options and my reasoning behind the choice.
The problem I want to highlight is: How do you actually choose the right infrastructure for a new project?

Read more…

Recently I visited Jazoon, an international conference for Java developers at Zurich, Switzerland.

Having heard a lot of interesting talks, I want to sum up my impressions and try to figure out some of the latest trends in the world of Java as well as interesting facts for software architects.

This is part 4 of my series of blog posts and deals with

Google Android

In his talk about the Google Android platform, Peter Wlodarczak described the experiences he made when developing a mobile application for the new Smartphone OS from Google.

His application is a mobile translator, which is even able to do some OCR in order to translate e.g. Chinese signs.

Developing applications for Windows CE based Smartphones for years, I want to compare the impressions I got from Android to the experiences I made with Windows CE.

Read more…

You can put the following lines in your wordpress theme into footer.php to see how much SQL statements were executed for generating the page and how long the whole process of generating the page took:

Read more…

Recently I visited Jazoon, an international conference for Java developers at Zurich, Switzerland.

Having heard a lot of interesting talks, I want to sum up my impressions and try to figure out some of the latest trends in the world of Java as well as interesting facts for software architects.

This is part 3 of my series of blog posts and deals with

Ajax Push

Having worked with ICEfaces (but suspended work for now due to a lot of bugs), I was curious to hear a talk of one of the guys of ICEfaces, Ted Goddard.

The topic was Ajax Push. Surely, Ajax is a buzzword of today and everybody wants to have some Ajax functionality in his application, maybe just to be cool.

Read more…

Recently I visited Jazoon, an international conference for Java developers at Zurich, Switzerland.

Having heard a lot of interesting talks, I want to sum up my impressions and try to figure out some of the latest trends in the world of Java as well as interesting facts for software architects.

This is part 2 of my series of blog posts and deals with

Google Web Toolkit

I visited two talks about the GWT.

As you probably know, Google Web Toolkit follows the idea that the presentation layer of a web application can be entirely written in plain Java.
Mainly, the GWT is a compiler that compiles your Java code into highly optimized JavaScript, that is executed on the client side.

Read more…

Recently I visited Jazoon, an international conference for Java developers at Zurich, Switzerland.

Having heard a lot of interesting talks, I want to sum up my impressions and try to figure out some of the latest trends in the world of Java as well as interesting facts for software architects.

This is part 1 of my series of blog posts and deals with

Scala

This keynote was presented by Martin Odersky, a professor at EPFL in Lausanne, Switzerland. Maybe you have already heard of him. He is about to develop a programming language that could be the successor of Java: Scala.

Read more…

I’m really disappointed about how stupid web forms are sometimes. Consider this:

  • A captcha that has as a side-note: “Please do not enter whitespace characters“.
    • Why can’t the website just filter the whitespace?
  • A edit field for a URL that has as a side-note: “Please also enter the http://“.
    • Why can’t the website just add the http:// when it is missing?!
  • A submit button with side-note “Please hit submit only once“.
    • Most websites don’t have this anymore, they disable the Submit button with Javascript. Thank you :)
  • A edit field for a phone number that insists on a specific number format.
    • Does the number format matter in any way except for the +Countrycode at the beginning? Why not just filter everything except numbers?

All of these mentioned are even happening on very big sites who should have the people who know better. Are there any reasons except annoying me?

Does anyone have more examples? Please comment :)

(Translated from the blog of guruz)

Update: Blogoscoped has another posting about forms in websites.