Today, I had some time to spend on my new open source movie collection web application, MovDB2.
I did some thinking about infrastructure, and collected my decisions on the project wiki.

The thing is: Most of these decisions have been done more or less arbitrarily.
I’ll list my available options and my reasoning behind the choice.
The problem I want to highlight is: How do you actually choose the right infrastructure for a new project?

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Recently I visited Jazoon, an international conference for Java developers at Zurich, Switzerland.

Having heard a lot of interesting talks, I want to sum up my impressions and try to figure out some of the latest trends in the world of Java as well as interesting facts for software architects.

This is part 4 of my series of blog posts and deals with

Google Android

In his talk about the Google Android platform, Peter Wlodarczak described the experiences he made when developing a mobile application for the new Smartphone OS from Google.

His application is a mobile translator, which is even able to do some OCR in order to translate e.g. Chinese signs.

Developing applications for Windows CE based Smartphones for years, I want to compare the impressions I got from Android to the experiences I made with Windows CE.

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Recently I visited Jazoon, an international conference for Java developers at Zurich, Switzerland.

Having heard a lot of interesting talks, I want to sum up my impressions and try to figure out some of the latest trends in the world of Java as well as interesting facts for software architects.

This is part 3 of my series of blog posts and deals with

Ajax Push

Having worked with ICEfaces (but suspended work for now due to a lot of bugs), I was curious to hear a talk of one of the guys of ICEfaces, Ted Goddard.

The topic was Ajax Push. Surely, Ajax is a buzzword of today and everybody wants to have some Ajax functionality in his application, maybe just to be cool.

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Recently I visited Jazoon, an international conference for Java developers at Zurich, Switzerland.

Having heard a lot of interesting talks, I want to sum up my impressions and try to figure out some of the latest trends in the world of Java as well as interesting facts for software architects.

This is part 2 of my series of blog posts and deals with

Google Web Toolkit

I visited two talks about the GWT.

As you probably know, Google Web Toolkit follows the idea that the presentation layer of a web application can be entirely written in plain Java.
Mainly, the GWT is a compiler that compiles your Java code into highly optimized JavaScript, that is executed on the client side.

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Recently I visited Jazoon, an international conference for Java developers at Zurich, Switzerland.

Having heard a lot of interesting talks, I want to sum up my impressions and try to figure out some of the latest trends in the world of Java as well as interesting facts for software architects.

This is part 1 of my series of blog posts and deals with

Scala

This keynote was presented by Martin Odersky, a professor at EPFL in Lausanne, Switzerland. Maybe you have already heard of him. He is about to develop a programming language that could be the successor of Java: Scala.

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Lately, I have started becoming more and more interested in job interviews. Part of that might be because I’m in the finishing run of my diploma thesis, and so I’ll likely start my first real job the next months.

NOOP.NL has an article on the perfect job interview question. A question that can single-handedly decide the fate of an interviewee (at least at the linked shop ;)).

The question: When reviewing somebody else’s code, what is it that you usually find most disturbing?
Some people will rant about a programming style guide, but few will mention the architecture.

I found the reasoning behind it all the more interesting. The thing is, while architecture is obviously a pet field I love to be in, I think I wouldn’t have given it as answer to the “perfect question”: In most situations, you can’t even determine the system architecture from just looking at one person’s code.

Maybe the question is just short on details. The question is interesting, the answer to why it is important is kinda non-negotiable, but the process of weeding people out solely because of their answer to this is… well… questionable.

Most applications need to use timers to do things every few seconds. They are needed for maintenance work, network keep alive or other reasons. In most cases, they don’t need to be very exact.

I’m wondering why they are not synchronized on the OS-level: All applications do their maintenance work directly after each other and then the CPU is allowed to go to a state with lower power consumption. The current case is probably that it can’t even go low-power because all applications have their timers fired at arbitrary times.

Does anyone know about such possibilities in the major operation systems?