There are a lot of commercial stress and load testing tools available, but in general they are really expensive, so buying one is probably not the best idea if you just want to stress-test a single web application for one time, like I did.

Instead, I checked out some Open Source tools and found Webload, an Open Source variant of a more comprehensive tool developed by Radview. The download can be found here (it’s not available on the official website any more).

The tool comes with a graphical user interface both for creating test scripts (Webload IDE) and for launching and monitoring tests (Webload console).

Scripts can be recorded by simply clicking links in your browser. Afterwards, the script can be used to create the actual test, consisting of an arbitrary number of virtual users that follow the actions defined in the script. Webload allows monitoring of any values you can think of, ranging from the number of executed requests to throughput in bytes per second.

Because of all those features that seem unique for an Open Source stress test tool, Webload is really worth a tip here at codingclues :)

Well, the following post does not cover a typical programming topic, but maybe even as a software engineer you might have to deal with (web) design from time to time. At least I did when developing a new website for a customer (http://heilmann-software.de).

While creating shiny and glossy effects seems to be a trivial task for the experts using Photoshop, I tried a lot until I got some good results with Gimp, the Open Source image editor.

My goal was to develop a “shiny table” effect from a screenshot that was rotated into the view. Below you can see an example (of the result, of course ;))

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Today I want to introduce my new project Cloud42, an Open Source management framework for Cloud Computing with Amazon EC2.
This is not intended to be a dumb advertisement. Instead, the main cause for this post here is that Cloud42 is very interesting for developers and therefore can be of value for you, too.

Cloud42 is a web application written in Java. It provides both a AJAX-enabled GUI and an extensive Web service interface, allowing you to invoke its functionalities from your own application or from within BPEL processes.

Besides the basic functionalities like starting, stopping and monitoring EC2 AMI instances, Cloud42 offers some enhanced functions like transferring files and bundling new AMIs. Furthermore, it is possible to control your instances remotely by sending arbitrary commands through the Web service interface (or by using the GUI). A notification mechanism following the publish/subscribe pattern allows you to subscribe any endpoint to events that occur on an AMI instance.

This sounds interesting? Then visit the website at cloud42.net!
And don’t forget to drop a comment here!

I sometimes get this error in the J2EE (or JEE) module settings in the project options when changing modules. The settings will not even show what modules are chosen.

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If Eclipse complains that it cannot start JBoss (”Timeout waiting for JBOSS 5.0 to start. Server did not start after 50s.”) then try to set the timeout to a higher value. It can be done in the options:

Windows -> Preferences -> Server -> Server timeout delay

There are a lot of tips and hints out there on the internet, which describe how you could add support for Java Server Faces and Facelets to the Eclipse environment.
Mostly, they deal with adding code completion for JSF/Facelets tags and so on. There are some possibilities to achieve this, ranging from creating TLD files to using the JSP editor in Eclipse for the XHTML code of the Facelets pages.

But the “trick” I prefer is much more simple :D

You want to see it? Well, just download and install the JBoss Tools and you have it all!

You are wondering why your JUnit tests run very fine when you launch them using Eclipse, whereas they all break down when building your project with a build system like Ant or Maven?

Well, thats probably because you are using assert statements and Eclipse per default is not configured to evaluate them.

To solve this problem, simpy go to Run -> Run… -> Arguments, and in the box labeled VM arguments:, enter either -enableassertions or just -ea.

That’s it!

Today, I had some time to spend on my new open source movie collection web application, MovDB2.
I did some thinking about infrastructure, and collected my decisions on the project wiki.

The thing is: Most of these decisions have been done more or less arbitrarily.
I’ll list my available options and my reasoning behind the choice.
The problem I want to highlight is: How do you actually choose the right infrastructure for a new project?

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Recently I inserted about 200 rows into a MySQL table using Hibernate.

However, my application had an error because of missing data and I explored the database in order to find the problem.

In general, SQuirreL is a good tool to do this and I like using it, but this time it made me crazy.

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